Last edited by Kishura
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of mountain men and the fur trade of the far West found in the catalog.

mountain men and the fur trade of the far West

Le Roy Reuben Hafen

mountain men and the fur trade of the far West

biographical sketches of the participants by scholars of the subject and with introductions by the editor.

by Le Roy Reuben Hafen

  • 393 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by A.H. Clark Co. in Glendale, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fur trade -- The West,
  • West (U.S.) -- Biography

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsF592 H2
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14296205M

    The legendary mountain men--the fur traders and trappers who penetrated the Rocky Mountains and explored the Far West in the first half on the nineteenth century--formed the vanguard of the American empire and became the heroes of American adventure. This volume brings to the general reader brief biographies of eighteen representative mountain men, selected from among the essay assembled by. The American Fur Trade of the Far West is the premier history of its subject. Its publication in $ The Mountain Men: The Dramatic History and Lore of the First Frontiersmen by George Laycock "The mountain man, weathered and wind-bitten, .

    The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West. Glendale, CA.: Arthur H. Clark Company, The ten volumes include short biographies of the mountain men. Indispensable to any student of the mountain fur trade. These are in most Wyoming libraries, and there is a detailed guide online. Online. The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West (Hardcover) Biographical Sketches of the Participants by Scholars of the Subjects and with Introductions by th. By Leroy R. Hafen (Editor) Arthur H. Clark Company, , pp. Publication Date: May 1, Other Editions of This Title: Hardcover (10/1/).

    Get this from a library! The mountain men and the fur trade of the far West: biographical sketches of the participants of scholars of the subject and with introduction by the editor. [LeRoy R Hafen]. The colonial fur trade, and later the mountain man fur trade, had a pronounced effect on Native American Indians. The federal government tried to protect the American Indians from land speculators, fur traders, and eventually the mountain men and the suppliers of the mountain man rendezvous through the Trade and Intercourse Acts.


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Mountain men and the fur trade of the far West by Le Roy Reuben Hafen Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West Series (Book 9). Biographical sketches of the participants by scholars of the subject and with introductions by the editor LeRoy R. Hafen -- State Historian of Colorado, Emeritus Professor of History, Brigham Young University.

Hafen's "Mountain Men" The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West. Leroy R. Hafen, editor. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 10 volumes. A fundamental reference for the lives of mountain men. Individual biographies were written by Hafen and the leading historians of the time.

This volume brings to the general reader brief biographies of eighteen representative mountain men, selected from among the essay assembled by LeRoy R. Hafen in The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West (ten volumes, )/5(15). LeRoy R. Hafen () was Professor of History at the University of Denver and Brigham Young University, Executive Director of the State Historical Society of Colorado, and author/editor of numerous books on the American West, including Ruxton of the Rockies, Fur Trappers and Traders of the Far Southwest: Twenty Biographical Sketches, and Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western 5/5(1).

Mountain Men were the principal figures of the fur trade era, one of the most interesting, dramatic, and truly significant phases of the history of the American trans-Mississippi West during the first half of the 19th Century.

These men were of all types—some were fugitives from law and civilization, others were the best in rugged manhood; some were heroic, some brutal, most were adventurous. HAFEN, LeRoy R. The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West. Biographical Sketches of the Participants by Scholars of the Subject ans With Introductions by the Editor.

Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Co., 10 vols. Illus. maps. A fine, untrimmed set in orig. cloth. A very difficult set to obtain.

The legendary mountain men--the fur traders and trappers who penetrated the Rocky Mountains and explored the Far West in the first half on the nineteenth century--formed the vanguard of the American empire and became the heroes of American adventure/5(3).

The legendary mountain menthe fur traders and trappers who penetrated the Rocky Mountains and explored the Far West in the first half on the nineteenth centuryformed the vanguard of the American empire and became the heroes of American adventure/5. Ross, Alexander: The Fur Hunters of the Far West.

Chicago: The Lakeside Press, First edition. Near fine in dark green cloth covered boards with gilt text on the spine and bright gilt decorations on the front board, a gilt top edge to the text block with minor rubbing to the cloth at the head of the spine.

A mountain man is an explorer who lives in the wilderness. Mountain men were most common in the North American Rocky Mountains from about through to the s (with a peak population in the early s). They were instrumental in opening up the various Emigrant Trails (widened into wagon roads) allowing Americans in the east to settle the new territories of the far west by organized wagon Activity sectors: Rocky Mountains, Sierra.

86 rows  This is a list of explorers, trappers, guides, and other frontiersmen of the North American. Get this from a library.

Mountain men and fur traders of the Far West: eighteen biographical sketches. [LeRoy R Hafen; Harvey L Carter;] -- Chapters on: Manuel Lisa, Pierre Chouteau, Jr., Wilson Price Hunt, William H.

Ashley, Jedediah Smith, John McLoughlin, Peter Skene Ogden, Ceran St. Vrain, Kit Carson, William Sherley (Old Bill). The book is part of Hafen’s volume study of mountain men and the fur trade, although this particular volume is a bit shorter than the others in the series.

I would highly suggest checking out The Fur Trapper website for a breakdown of some of the stats on mountain men from Hafen's works. Mountain Men were the principal figures of the fur trade era, one of the most interesting, dramatic, and truly significant phases of the history of the American trans-Mississippi West during the first half of the 19th Century.

These men were of all types&#;some were fugitives from law and Pages: Mountain Men and Fur Traders of the Far West: Eighteen Biographical Sketches Volume of A bison book: Editor: LeRoy Reuben Hafen: Photographs by: Harvey Lewis Carter: Edition: illustrated, reprint: Publisher: U of Nebraska Press, ISBN:Length: pages: Subjects.

From their ranks came men who still command respect for their daring, skill, and resourcefulness. This volume brings together brief biographies of seventeen leaders of the western fur trade, selected from essays assembled by LeRoy R. Hafen in The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West (ten volumes, –72).

The far West became a field of romantic adventure and developed a class of men who loved the wandering career of the native inhabitant rather than the toilsome lot of the industrious colonist. The type of life thus developed, though essentially evanescent, and not representing any profound national movement, was a distinct and necessary phase.

Fur Traders and Mountain Men. After explorers Meriwether Lewis (–) and William Clark (–) led the first expedition of white explorers across the western half of North America in –6, a large group of hardy adventurers prepared to head west.

(See Lewis and Clark Expedition.)From Lewis and Clark's reports they had learned that the West was teeming with beavers. This "on-line research center" features information on all aspects of mountain men, trappers, and the fur trade in the American West of 19th-century.

Traditions, history, tools, and survival techniques are addressed. Digital library, virtual museum, bibliographic resources, period text, e-mail discussion group are available at this searchable site.

Mountain Men At The Mouth Of Bighorn Canyon, having packed valuable furs over the rugged uplands, prepared for yet another perilous journey. Mountain Men And The Bad Pass Trail was a perfect fit to carry furs back from fur trade rendezvous. The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West: Biographical Sketches of the Participants by Scholars of the Subject and with Introductions by the Editor.

Volume VII by Hafen, LeRoy R. (Ed.) and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Diaries, Narratives, and Letters of the Mountain Men These documents are accounts of the Rocky Mountain fur trade during the first half of the 19th century.

Most of these are either primary or secondary historical sources; that is, either written by, or as told by those who were actually there.Of the know deaths, fur trade historian, James Hannon Jr.

documented six mountain men killed by grizzly in his article “Death in the Far West Among Trappers and Traders” in the Rocky Mountain Fur Trade Journal. Of those who survived a grizzly bear attack, Hugh Glass and .